Case study: hock lesions as a potential source of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

Hock injuries are a common injury in dairy cows that are housed indoors for the greater part of the year. Oftentimes, the lesions indicate inadequate stall or cubicle design in dairy barns. The presence and severity of hock lesions are associated with lameness and other disorders of the limb, which is why most welfare evaluations target hock lesion reductions to improve cow welfare. It is thought that hock lesions may also be associated with mastitis and reduced milk yield. In order to better understand the association between hock lesions and the development of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis, an undergraduate student from the University of Vermont (UVM), US headed-up a case study within the student-run herd as a senior thesis project with the help of her advisor Dr. John Barlow and his graduate students. Veterinarian and UVM PhD student Caitlin Jeffrey presented the findings at the National Mastitis Council Annual Meeting, held in February of this year.

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Patterns of mastitis indicators during a clinical mastitis episode

Mastitis is one the most common and costly diseases of dairy cattle, hence widely studied globally. It is the inflammation of one or more quarters of the mammary glands, mostly caused by various microorganisms. Based on whether gross changes in milk (such as watery, serous, or purulent milk, presence of clots, flakes, or blood), gross changes in the udder (such as painful or inflamed udder) and animal are seen or not, mastitis is categorized either into clinical or subclinical. With the introduction of Automatic Milking Systems (AMS), the sensors can measure milk parameters every time the cow goes for milking.

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Diego B. Nobrega working on antimicrobial use and resistance in Canadian dairy herds

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the most important threats to human and animal health. There are indications of a pending “post-antibiotic era” where AMR will cause 10 million human deaths per year globally by 2050 if no serious action is taken (O’Neill, 2016).

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From feces to milk, bovine non-aureus staphylococci are everywhere

Text and picture: Ameline Wuytack Non-aureus staphylococci (NAS) are worldwide the most common cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in lactating cows. This heterogeneous group of bacteria consists of 54 species of which at least 42 have been isolated from bovine-associated…...

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Subclinical Mycoplasma bovis udder infection impairs udder health and decreases milk production

Mycoplasma (M.) bovis belongs to the Mollicute genus bacteria, which lack a cell wall and are the smallest self-replicating bacteria with a parasitic way of life. M. bovis is categorised as contagious mastitis pathogen causing both clinical and subclinical mastitis…....

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Udder cleft dermatitis in dairy cows – epidemiological and microbiological studies

Udder cleft dermatitis (UCD) is a skin condition that develops at the fore udder attachment, or between the udder halves, of dairy cows. The UCD lesions vary in appearance from mild, eczematous skin changes, to severe, with wounds that often…...

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